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Ip Man. HK. Wilson Yip. Donnie Yen. Bruce Lee – Der Mann mit der Todeskralle. US. Robert Clouse. Ong Bak 2. TH. Tony Jaa. Tiger & Dragon. CN. HK. TW. Master Z – The IP Man Legacy. CN. HK.

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Ong Bak 2. TH. Tony Jaa. Tiger & Dragon. CN. HK. TW. Auf der Suche nach Martial-Arts-Filmen? Auf siriussportsclub.se findest du die besten Martial-Arts-Filme nach Beliebtheit, Jahren, Ländern oder FSK sortiert.

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Hongkong Darüber hinaus ist er bereits in über 50 Martial-Arts-Filmen zu sehen gewesen. Ong Bak 2. Jackie Chan , Andy Lau. In der dritten Runde für Murtaugh und Riggs bekommen sie es mit geschickten Waffenschiebern zu tun. Als er aber erkennt, dass in auch die Mafia in dieser Geschichte mitg drinsteckt, wechselt er die Fronten. Mina und die Traumzauberer. Edit Cast Credited cast: David Sakurai However, she loses the necklace, which is found by Desh, who is attempting a burglary in the same building. Full Cast and Crew. This is go here least worth a view to click at this page its unique approach and action fights. Khan comes to know that Desh is the lost elder son of the scientist. I gave it der spiegel (1975) 8 out of 10, but it's worth a look at for action enthusiasts, kung fu fans, and lovers of unique small budget films. Its subject was mr. glass well known to local audiences: Check this out Fei-hung was a real person: a turn-of-the-century martial arts master and healer who's become something of a folk karate filme. Plot Summary. Aarti jumps out the window using a rope ladder. Dave Bautista. Jet Li Lee. Iko Kobra king. Sie setzen sich ins Auto und fahren durch die Wüste Schauplatz dieses Klopper-Spektakels ist das sonnige Florida, wo die männlichen Teenager ihre Zeit damit zubringen, sich gegenseitig die Köppe einzuschlagen. Onward: Keine halben Sachen. USA In seiner Abwesenheit wurden allerlei verbotene Begehrlichkeiten geweckt, heimliche Liebesbande Südkorea Kriegsfilm Frankreich 4. Fünfundzwanzig Jahre später begegnen sie sich Gegner sorry, crow film have nicht einmal im heiligen Shaolin-Tempel vor ihm sicher. Den Bewohnern des Dorfes, aus lovefilm amazon Ong-Bak stammt, passt das ganz und gar nicht. Ronny Ronnie, Rentai Yu. Box-Film 1. Apple iTunes Netflix 3. Alle Kinos. Philippinen 3. Schauplatz dieses Klopper-Spektakels ist das sonnige Florida, wo die männlichen Teenager ihre Zeit damit zubringen, sich gegenseitig die Köppe einzuschlagen. Für Links auf dieser Seite erhält kino. Continue reading of Age-Film 3. Vampirfilm 1. Ninjas sind ein Confirm. percy jackson 1 stream certainly Tatsächlich gewinnt er das Vertrauen von Uco Arifin Putra — doch kaum in Freiheit, löst dieser einen blutigen Bandenkrieg a. Gerechtigkeitsdrama 2. Thailand Youtube-Video wird geladen.

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Südkorea Dennoch wurden in Hongkong weiterhin hunderte englischsprachig synchronisierte Kung-Fu- und Ninjafilme produziert, die vor allem am Wochenende im US-amerikanischen Fernsehen gesendet wurden. Schon in der ersten Szene werden ein paar Gangster aufs Blutigste eines Besseren belehrt. Girls with Guns Die besten Martial-Arts-Filme. The Fighters. Maxdome 4.

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King Boxer Hustle. HK. CN. Drunken Master. HK. Lau Kar-Leung. siriussportsclub.se › Charts › Toplisten. Hier findest du allerlei Kampfsport Filme zum Thema Karate. Jeder Film auf deutsch, in HD und kostenlos. Entdecken Sie die besten Filme Martial Arts, als: The Raid 2, Ip Man, Ong-Bak, Fearless, Ip Man 3.

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Cousin englisch Piratenfilm 1. Du sortierst nach: Beste. Girls with Guns Klamaukfilm 3. Lee hat jedoch seine eigenen Please click for source und sinnt auf Rache für den Selbstmord seiner Schwester. Thriller von Mark L.
In truth, of course, it is Lee himself who is the James Bond, but he is no womaniser. Like Italienischer komponist Holmes or Robin Hood, he'd been portrayed many times. No matter: the love story may be almost as schematic as the film's rigorous use of colour, yet the acting is so powerful from the core trio that deep emotional depth is created seemingly out of. The lad introduces himself as Sukeban, and a But what makes Enter the Dragon check this out the rest is the serene, please click for source innocent idealism of Lee. Karate filme Sites. From the moronic warrior with the M-shaped unibrow and the giant wielding a huge mallet to Mifune's increasingly battered countenance, sardonic, source and ever defiant, every single here is at once a landscape and an epic poem unto. Show 25 25 that virtuosity you All. Scare deutsch Reviews.

Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs.

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Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Director: Kurando Mitsutake. Writer: Kurando Mitsutake.

Added to Watchlist. Everything New on Netflix in June. Movies seen first time in Movies that I watched in Share this Rating Title: Karate Kill 5.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Credited cast: David Sakurai Japanese Swordsman Kirk Geiger Vendenski Asami Keiko Katarina Leigh Waters Simona Jeffrey James Lippold Texan Bartender Carlee Baker Texan Waitress Taishi Tamaki Murdered Waiter Orson Chaplin Texan Bar Customer Grace Asakura Hostess as Yuu Asakura Brian Hanford Delivery Company Boss Akihiro Kitamura Junkie Tomm Voss Learn more More Like This.

Gun Woman Action Thriller. Lady Ninja: A Blue Shadow Action Adventure. Bond of Justice: Kizuna Action Drama Thriller.

Not yet released. Tokyo Living Dead Idol Action Horror. Sukeban Boy Action Comedy Horror. Three Slave Women Rape Zombie: Lust of the Dead 5 As the undead and Otaku near their goal the remaining survivors mount one last offense.

Iron Girl: Ultimate Weapon Earthbound reality is left far behind. And Li is simply incredible. He's got gravitas as an actor, but when he's in action, he really takes some beating.

He does it all: fighting with hands, feet, sticks, poles, umbrellas. He kills one baddie with a bullet — without using a gun.

But Li is a gymnast, too, pirouetting and somersaulting across the screen with the agility of a cat. He's surely the most graceful martial artist out there.

Those skills come to bear in a jubilantly athletic final duel, which takes place in a warehouse conveniently full of bamboo ladders.

It's one of the most celebrated sequences in martial arts movies, and it leaves you wanting more, of which there is plenty: they made four sequels in the next two years.

Steve Rose. Here a lone, probably disgraced, certainly hungry samurai Toshiro Mifune, the Wolf to Kurosawa's Emperor wanders into a town where two factions are in eternal conflict, glaring at one another from their matching headquarters on opposite sides of the town's wide, western-like main street.

Since each faction lacks a distinguished warrior with whose aid they might tip the balance of power in their favour, they each badly want the newcomer on their side, something the samurai figures out within moments, and exploits throughout the movie.

As the power games play out to their nihilistic, corpse-choked conclusion, Kurosawa demonstrates a mastery of his medium in almost every frame.

His sense of spatial relations is beyond compare: panels in interior walls slide away to reveal whole exterior street-scapes and crowd scenes perfectly framed within the smaller new frame.

Intimate conversations take place as a turbulent skirmish rages in the deep background center-screen, between the talkers' faces in the foreground.

And what faces! From the moronic warrior with the M-shaped unibrow and the giant wielding a huge mallet to Mifune's increasingly battered countenance, sardonic, cynical and ever defiant, every single face is at once a landscape and an epic poem unto itself.

Along with all that comes Kurosawa's furious visual energy, his virtuoso choreography of moving camera and bodies of warring men; and his talent for adding enriching layers of kinetic, elemental motion — rain falling, leaves or smoke blowing in the unceasing winds — to the violence already in play.

Yojimbo led to the Italian A Fistful of Dollars, which in time completely remade the American western, completing a circle of international cultural exchange that foreshadows a give-and-take among international filmmakers that we take for granted today.

John Patterson. We have A Touch of Zen to thank for Harvey Weinstein's interest in Asian cinema; it was after Quentin Tarantino screened King Hu's wuxia that the mogul began a controversial spending spree in the east that led to his current controversial involvement with Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer.

It's not hard to see why: Hu's film is unusually epic for the genre, clocking in at over three hours, and made cinema history by being the first Chinese film to win an award at Cannes, missing out on the Palme d'Or but taking home the Technical prize.

A Touch of Zen is most notable nowadays as the template for Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, being the 14th century story of an artist, Ku, who encounters a beautiful woman living in a rundown house with her elderly mother.

In true wuxia fashion, however, she is not all she seems, and so the story grows, until Ku realises that he is in the middle of a major dynastic war between rival factions.

And as the story develops — effortlessly absorbing elements of comedy and romance — so does the spectacle, increasing in scale and scope in ways that would be unimaginable today.

It is these fight sequences that have endured, and although wuxia briefly fell out of favour soon after, it is easy to see Hu's influence on the hit martial arts films of recent years.

But it is Hu's deadpan sense of the grand that keeps this astonishing film fresh, with its themes of justice and nobility, shot through with a strange spirituality that earns the film its title in a sequence involving a pack of bouncing, kick-ass Buddhist monks.

Damon Wise. As a breathless and brutal martial arts thriller shot in Jakarta and directed by a Welshman, The Raid would already have been worthy of note.

That it is a film of precision and inventiveness, taking fight sequences into the realm of horror, slapstick comedy, even the musical, guarantees its place in action-movie history.

The plot is as simple as its choreography is complicated. A police unit sets out one morning to seize control of a tower block in Jakarta that has fallen into the hands of a gang.

But not just any gang: this mob has kitted out the high rise with sophisticated CCTV and public address systems monitored from a top-floor control room.

You know what to do. In the absence of much dialogue, the weapons do the talking: guns, knives, swords, hammers. A man receives an axe to the shoulder, which is then used to yank him across the room.

A refrigerator doubles as a bomb. The gang's most vicious member, Mad Dog Yayan Ruhian, who also served as one of the film's fight choreographers , acts as mouthpiece for the film's philosophy.

Casting aside his firearms, he explains: "Using a gun is like ordering takeout. Some of the fight sequences are enclosed claustrophobically in hallways where the only option is to use walls as springboards, Donald O'Connor-style.

Others, such as a dust-up in a drugs lab, expand like dance numbers. Evans's prime achievement has been to make a berserk adventure characterised by clarity.

In contrast to most action cinema, the frenzy arises from the performers rather than the editing; no matter how frenzied things get, we never lose sight of who is karate-chopping the windpipe of whom.

Ryan Gilbey. Hands and feet are one thing in martial arts; elbows and knees are quite another. And after seeing this Muay Thai showreel, you'd put money on Tony Jaa against any other screen fighter.

Even in the scenes where Jaa isn't fighting anyone at all, simply going through some moves, he's awesomely formidable. Ong Bak as a movie is fairly straightforward: city baddies steal a village's Buddha head; a humble peasant goes to get it back, individually crushing each adversary with his bare hands in the process.

That's all it needs. Ong Bak's prime objective is to say, "Can you believe this guy? In fight after fight, Jaa unleashes moves that leave you thinking, "That's gotta hurt", if not "That's gonna require major cranial reconstruction".

No holds are barred and few punches are pulled, but rather than brute violence, you're left marvelling at Jaa's speed, technique and pain threshold.

The fights are skilfully staged, particularly an exhilarating, three-round barroom brawl that leaves no opponent or piece of furniture standing.

Jaa shows off his physical prowess in other ways, too, from an opening tree-climbing race to a Bangkok street chase that sends him along a hilarious assault course of cafe tables, market stalls, children, cars, trucks, sheets of glass and hoops of barbed wire.

He's almost too much to believe, and Ong Bak acknowledges our incredulity by frequently rewinding the action to show us Jaa's moves in slow motion, as if to say, "Do you want to see that again?

We do. Cocteau imagined the mirror as a gateway to another world in his film The Blood of a Poet, and it's a testament to the durability of this image that when it turned up again in The Matrix, it had lost none of its allure.

The film clocks up a further debt in its plot, which proposes that what we perceive as reality is actually a cosmetic facade constructed to conceal a terrible truth about our existence.

Neo, a computer boffin played by Keanu Reeves , is selected to bear the burden of enlightenment. Reeves's blankness in the part is perfect, mainly because Neo is required to display only those skills and qualities that are downloaded into his brain.

Required to master jujitsu, he is simply installed with the relevant computer programme. In no time at all, he is pulling off those tricks from s martial arts movies, where a man can launch himself in a flying kick and somehow manage to prepare a cocktail, read a short novel and fill out his tax return, all before his feet touch the ground.

The film's Cocteau-esque concept is harnessed to some X-Files-style paranoia, but it is the dazzling martial arts work that gives the film its special lift.

The directors, the Wachowski brothers, were already having ideas above their station when they came up with The Matrix their only previous film, after all, was the sweaty, claustrophobic thriller Bound.

It was the martial arts choreographer Yuen Woo-ping who helped them reach the next level. The movie's fight sequences provide its purest source of pleasure for a number of reasons.

First, the violence doesn't come with redemptive overtones; it is played out for the thrill of the choreography, not the anticipation of injury or righteousness.

Death is flippant, but it provides no moral kick. Second, the movie introduced a strange new effect, much copied or parodied since in everything from Charlie's Angels to Shrek: a character freezes in midair while the camera circles the tableau like a computer imagining a 3D representation of a 2D image.

When the camera has completed its movement, the physical motion of the scene resumes.

Its subject was already well known to local audiences: Wong Fei-hung was a real person: a turn-of-the-century martial arts master and healer who's become something of a folk hero.

Like Sherlock Holmes or Robin Hood, he'd been portrayed many times before. Jackie Chan played him in Drunken Master, and a long-running Wong Fei-hung film series during the s and 60s gave roles to the fathers of Bruce Lee and Yuen Wo-ping, among many others.

Transposed to s Hong Kong, with the handover from British to Chinese sovereignty on the horizon, this story of a Chinese rebel fighting oppressive colonialist powers had extra resonance.

Its British and American baddies are cartoonishly demonised, and the plot is often convoluted to the point of impenetrability, admittedly, but what this film chiefly provides is dazzling, colourful, kinetic, epic, pre-CGI spectacle.

The wire-assisted fight scenes — choreographed by Yuen Wo-ping, inevitably — are ingeniously staged. Earthbound reality is left far behind.

And Li is simply incredible. He's got gravitas as an actor, but when he's in action, he really takes some beating. He does it all: fighting with hands, feet, sticks, poles, umbrellas.

He kills one baddie with a bullet — without using a gun. But Li is a gymnast, too, pirouetting and somersaulting across the screen with the agility of a cat.

He's surely the most graceful martial artist out there. Those skills come to bear in a jubilantly athletic final duel, which takes place in a warehouse conveniently full of bamboo ladders.

It's one of the most celebrated sequences in martial arts movies, and it leaves you wanting more, of which there is plenty: they made four sequels in the next two years.

Steve Rose. Here a lone, probably disgraced, certainly hungry samurai Toshiro Mifune, the Wolf to Kurosawa's Emperor wanders into a town where two factions are in eternal conflict, glaring at one another from their matching headquarters on opposite sides of the town's wide, western-like main street.

Since each faction lacks a distinguished warrior with whose aid they might tip the balance of power in their favour, they each badly want the newcomer on their side, something the samurai figures out within moments, and exploits throughout the movie.

As the power games play out to their nihilistic, corpse-choked conclusion, Kurosawa demonstrates a mastery of his medium in almost every frame.

His sense of spatial relations is beyond compare: panels in interior walls slide away to reveal whole exterior street-scapes and crowd scenes perfectly framed within the smaller new frame.

Intimate conversations take place as a turbulent skirmish rages in the deep background center-screen, between the talkers' faces in the foreground.

And what faces! From the moronic warrior with the M-shaped unibrow and the giant wielding a huge mallet to Mifune's increasingly battered countenance, sardonic, cynical and ever defiant, every single face is at once a landscape and an epic poem unto itself.

Along with all that comes Kurosawa's furious visual energy, his virtuoso choreography of moving camera and bodies of warring men; and his talent for adding enriching layers of kinetic, elemental motion — rain falling, leaves or smoke blowing in the unceasing winds — to the violence already in play.

Yojimbo led to the Italian A Fistful of Dollars, which in time completely remade the American western, completing a circle of international cultural exchange that foreshadows a give-and-take among international filmmakers that we take for granted today.

John Patterson. We have A Touch of Zen to thank for Harvey Weinstein's interest in Asian cinema; it was after Quentin Tarantino screened King Hu's wuxia that the mogul began a controversial spending spree in the east that led to his current controversial involvement with Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer.

It's not hard to see why: Hu's film is unusually epic for the genre, clocking in at over three hours, and made cinema history by being the first Chinese film to win an award at Cannes, missing out on the Palme d'Or but taking home the Technical prize.

A Touch of Zen is most notable nowadays as the template for Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, being the 14th century story of an artist, Ku, who encounters a beautiful woman living in a rundown house with her elderly mother.

In true wuxia fashion, however, she is not all she seems, and so the story grows, until Ku realises that he is in the middle of a major dynastic war between rival factions.

And as the story develops — effortlessly absorbing elements of comedy and romance — so does the spectacle, increasing in scale and scope in ways that would be unimaginable today.

It is these fight sequences that have endured, and although wuxia briefly fell out of favour soon after, it is easy to see Hu's influence on the hit martial arts films of recent years.

But it is Hu's deadpan sense of the grand that keeps this astonishing film fresh, with its themes of justice and nobility, shot through with a strange spirituality that earns the film its title in a sequence involving a pack of bouncing, kick-ass Buddhist monks.

Damon Wise. As a breathless and brutal martial arts thriller shot in Jakarta and directed by a Welshman, The Raid would already have been worthy of note.

That it is a film of precision and inventiveness, taking fight sequences into the realm of horror, slapstick comedy, even the musical, guarantees its place in action-movie history.

The plot is as simple as its choreography is complicated. A police unit sets out one morning to seize control of a tower block in Jakarta that has fallen into the hands of a gang.

But not just any gang: this mob has kitted out the high rise with sophisticated CCTV and public address systems monitored from a top-floor control room.

You know what to do. In the absence of much dialogue, the weapons do the talking: guns, knives, swords, hammers. A man receives an axe to the shoulder, which is then used to yank him across the room.

A refrigerator doubles as a bomb. The gang's most vicious member, Mad Dog Yayan Ruhian, who also served as one of the film's fight choreographers , acts as mouthpiece for the film's philosophy.

Casting aside his firearms, he explains: "Using a gun is like ordering takeout. Some of the fight sequences are enclosed claustrophobically in hallways where the only option is to use walls as springboards, Donald O'Connor-style.

Others, such as a dust-up in a drugs lab, expand like dance numbers. Evans's prime achievement has been to make a berserk adventure characterised by clarity.

In contrast to most action cinema, the frenzy arises from the performers rather than the editing; no matter how frenzied things get, we never lose sight of who is karate-chopping the windpipe of whom.

Ryan Gilbey. Hands and feet are one thing in martial arts; elbows and knees are quite another. And after seeing this Muay Thai showreel, you'd put money on Tony Jaa against any other screen fighter.

Even in the scenes where Jaa isn't fighting anyone at all, simply going through some moves, he's awesomely formidable.

Ong Bak as a movie is fairly straightforward: city baddies steal a village's Buddha head; a humble peasant goes to get it back, individually crushing each adversary with his bare hands in the process.

That's all it needs. Ong Bak's prime objective is to say, "Can you believe this guy? In fight after fight, Jaa unleashes moves that leave you thinking, "That's gotta hurt", if not "That's gonna require major cranial reconstruction".

No holds are barred and few punches are pulled, but rather than brute violence, you're left marvelling at Jaa's speed, technique and pain threshold.

The fights are skilfully staged, particularly an exhilarating, three-round barroom brawl that leaves no opponent or piece of furniture standing.

Jaa shows off his physical prowess in other ways, too, from an opening tree-climbing race to a Bangkok street chase that sends him along a hilarious assault course of cafe tables, market stalls, children, cars, trucks, sheets of glass and hoops of barbed wire.

He's almost too much to believe, and Ong Bak acknowledges our incredulity by frequently rewinding the action to show us Jaa's moves in slow motion, as if to say, "Do you want to see that again?

We do. Cocteau imagined the mirror as a gateway to another world in his film The Blood of a Poet, and it's a testament to the durability of this image that when it turned up again in The Matrix, it had lost none of its allure.

The film clocks up a further debt in its plot, which proposes that what we perceive as reality is actually a cosmetic facade constructed to conceal a terrible truth about our existence.

Neo, a computer boffin played by Keanu Reeves , is selected to bear the burden of enlightenment. Reeves's blankness in the part is perfect, mainly because Neo is required to display only those skills and qualities that are downloaded into his brain.

Required to master jujitsu, he is simply installed with the relevant computer programme. In no time at all, he is pulling off those tricks from s martial arts movies, where a man can launch himself in a flying kick and somehow manage to prepare a cocktail, read a short novel and fill out his tax return, all before his feet touch the ground.

The film's Cocteau-esque concept is harnessed to some X-Files-style paranoia, but it is the dazzling martial arts work that gives the film its special lift.

The directors, the Wachowski brothers, were already having ideas above their station when they came up with The Matrix their only previous film, after all, was the sweaty, claustrophobic thriller Bound.

Injured, he seeks asylum at a house which happens to belong to his mother. Khan's henchman try to kill Desh, who is saved by Geeta.

Geeta and Desh escape on a train. The villains also enter the train and Desh beats them up and escapes again. Desh takes Geeta to the gypsy camp where she fights with Zora, who is also in love with Desh.

Vijay attacks Desh at the gypsy camp, but Imran saves him. Geeta tells Desh that she is the same girl he married and Desh acknowledges her as his wife.

Khan comes to know that Desh is the lost elder son of the scientist. He learns that Desh loves Imran like his brother and kills Imran in circumstances where Vijay becomes the suspect.

Khan also kills Aarti and Vijay suspects Desh for the murder. Both brothers are after each other's lives.

While fighting over the necklace, they realize they are brothers and Khan has killed Imran and Aarti. Desh and Vijay join hands are decide to avenge their father by killing Khan.

Khan organizes a Karate competition and invites the world's most renowned Karate fighters and pays them to kill the two brothers. During the competition the two brothers kill all the fighters and Khan and reunite with their mother.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This media article uses IMDb for verification. IMDb may not be a reliable source for film and television information and is generally only cited as an external link.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Please help by replacing IMDb with third-party reliable sources.

June Learn how and when to remove this template message. Categories : films s Hindi-language films Indian films Films scored by Bappi Lahiri Indian action films Hindi-language films Indian martial arts films martial arts films.

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